A Griffon vulture was detained by Yemeni fighters, because of a suspicious satellite transmitter tagged to his wing when he came down to the country. He was suspected to be an espionage.

The vulture, whose name is Nelson, is approximately two years old and appeared to have journeyed from Bulgaria in September 2018 to Yemen recently in search of some food.

(AFP Photo/Mohammed HUWAIS)

His wing has been tagged and equipped with a satellite transmitter by the Fund for Wild Fauna and Flora (FWFF) back in Bulgaria, but it seemed he lost his way when he surprisingly ended up in the war-torn country.

Yemeni fighters thought the GPS tracker was a device made by rebels to spy on them, but Hisham al-Hoot, who represents FWFF in Yemen, travelled to Taez to plead with the government officials to release the vulture.

Hoot stated the bird migrated from Bulgaria, to Turkey, Jordan, Saudi Arabia and then Yemen. They lost track of Nelson by then, but by April 5, they received hundreds of concerned messages from Yemenis, who only wants what’s best for the helpless animal.

“It took about 12 days to get the bird,” Hoot told AFP. “The Bulgarian foreign ministry reached out to the Yemeni ambassador, who in turn contacted local officials (in Taez) and told them to immediately give the organization the vulture.”

(AFP Photo/Mohammed HUWAIS)

FWFF got hold of the vulture, who was in a very bad condition on the day Nelson was given to them. Hoot said Nelson was underweight and had a broken wing, which must have happened during his very long journey.

Hoot added that Nelson may be released in two months when the bird has regained its full strength.

“We thought at first it would take six months for him to heal, but now, we don’t think it will be more than two months,” he said. (a).then(function(b){if(!b)return tg(a).then(function(c){if(c)return ug(a)})}).then(function(){})}; var Gg=function(){this.a=[];this.b=0},Hg=function(a){if(2>a.b&&0

A Griffon vulture was detained by Yemeni fighters, because of a suspicious satellite transmitter tagged to his wing when he came down to the country. He was suspected to be an espionage.

The vulture, whose name is Nelson, is approximately two years old and appeared to have journeyed from Bulgaria in September 2018 to Yemen recently in search of some food.

His wing has been tagged and equipped with a satellite transmitter by the Fund for Wild Fauna and Flora (FWFF) back in Bulgaria, but it seemed he lost his way when he surprisingly ended up in the war-torn country.

Yemeni fighters thought the GPS tracker was a device made by rebels to spy on them, but Hisham al-Hoot, who represents FWFF in Yemen, travelled to Taez to plead with the government officials to release the vulture.

Hoot stated the bird migrated from Bulgaria, to Turkey, Jordan, Saudi Arabia and then Yemen. They lost track of Nelson by then, but by April 5, they received hundreds of concerned messages from Yemenis, who only wants what’s best for the helpless animal.

“It took about 12 days to get the bird,” Hoot told AFP. “The Bulgarian foreign ministry reached out to the Yemeni ambassador, who in turn contacted local officials (in Taez) and told them to immediately give the organization the vulture.”

FWFF got hold of the vulture, who was in a very bad condition on the day Nelson was given to them. Hoot said Nelson was underweight and had a broken wing, which must have happened during his very long journey.

Hoot added that Nelson may be released in two months when the bird has regained its full strength.

“We thought at first it would take six months for him to heal, but now, we don’t think it will be more than two months,” he said.

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